Eddie

Fight On!

209 notes

rhamphotheca:

John Oliver: ‘Our Drug Laws Seem a Little Draconian and a Lot Racist’

Clocking in at nearly 18 minutes, the comedian’s recent segment on the broken prison system could be one of his most inspired rants yet. Touching on everything from prison privatization to the inherent racism in the legal system to the fact that America has the “greatest number of prisoners of any country in the world” (an amount equivalent to the size of Slovenia’s entire population), John Oliver doesn’t hesitate to talk about “fact[s] that need to be spoken.”

This time, the “Last Week Tonight” host even got the help of America’s favorite Muppets to drive home his incredibly important point.

(via: TruthDig)

80 notes

rhamphotheca:

You shouldn’t try to pigeonhole quantum physics
Subatomic particles violate a basic principle underlying the concept of numbers and counting
by Tom Siegfried
Just when you thought quantum physics couldn’t get any weirder, it violates the pigeonhole principle.
No, it’s not about a pigeon in a hole that is simultaneously alive and dead. The pigeonhole principle is a basic tenet of mathematics. It illustrates what the very idea of numbers is all about. And it’s easy to state: If you put three pigeons in two pigeonholes, at least two of the pigeons end up in the same hole.
How can anybody, even a quantum physicist, argue with that? All you have to do is be able to count. Guess again, say quantum physicist Yakir Aharonov and collaborators in a new paper about the pigeonhole principle. “It seems … to be an abstract and immutable truth, beyond any doubt,” they write. “Yet … for quantum particles the principle does not hold.”…
(read more: Science News)

rhamphotheca:

You shouldn’t try to pigeonhole quantum physics

Subatomic particles violate a basic principle underlying the concept of numbers and counting

by Tom Siegfried

Just when you thought quantum physics couldn’t get any weirder, it violates the pigeonhole principle.

No, it’s not about a pigeon in a hole that is simultaneously alive and dead. The pigeonhole principle is a basic tenet of mathematics. It illustrates what the very idea of numbers is all about. And it’s easy to state: If you put three pigeons in two pigeonholes, at least two of the pigeons end up in the same hole.

How can anybody, even a quantum physicist, argue with that? All you have to do is be able to count. Guess again, say quantum physicist Yakir Aharonov and collaborators in a new paper about the pigeonhole principle. “It seems … to be an abstract and immutable truth, beyond any doubt,” they write. “Yet … for quantum particles the principle does not hold.”…

(read more: Science News)